Filler flowers can add pop to a floral arrangement or mellow it down. They aren’t quiet as exciting on their own, but when paired with other flowers they can make a monumental difference. Adding even the simplest of filler flowers can make a bouquet look more sophisticated. They come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and colors, so have fun testing out different types to find  what is right for you. Here is a list of the most popular types of filler flowers right now.

Brides looking for vertical drama in every shade except blue should consider the gladiolus. A single flower spike can sport more than two dozen blooms, often with fancy ruffled edges. Gladiolus flowers are very thirsty, taking up large amounts of water in the vase; however, make sure the water hasn’t been treated with fluoride, as this can cause the flowers and foliage to discolor.
A new bride that picks red roses for her wedding celebration flowers is sending out a message of enthusiasm and of intense love. If dark pink roses are used for a wedding celebration, the couple is sharing a thanks that they located each other.
Practice, practice, practice: No matter how simple your plan or how confident you might feel, plan to do at least one (preferably two) practice run. Purchase the flowers you've selected to construct one centerpiece and one bouquet and put them together. Keep track of how long it takes to prepare that one, then multiply the time by how many you'll need to make. This will give you a great idea of how much time you'll need to dedicate to the flowers when the big day arrives. You might find that you've bought more flowers than you need or that you need a fuller bow, requiring more ribbon. This is a better time to realize these things than on the wedding day.
If you’re planning a summer wedding, there is nothing more fitting than saying “I do” with sand between your toes. Because beach weddings are weather pertinent, summertime is your best bet for clear skies on your special day. With such a beautiful backdrop already wowing your guests, pastel-colored flowers will add a simple touch to your ceremony without being too overpowering.
When in doubt, ask your florist for some insight. According to event planner Kristine Cholakian Cooke, owner of Simply Charming Socials, your florist should be able to give you some great alternatives that meet your expectations visually and are also more accessible for your date. "We always find that brides who are more open-minded going into initial floral meetings can truly learn about flowers and options they didn't know existed," says Cooke. "In the end, the results can be beautiful and unexpected."
Practice, practice, practice: No matter how simple your plan or how confident you might feel, plan to do at least one (preferably two) practice run. Purchase the flowers you've selected to construct one centerpiece and one bouquet and put them together. Keep track of how long it takes to prepare that one, then multiply the time by how many you'll need to make. This will give you a great idea of how much time you'll need to dedicate to the flowers when the big day arrives. You might find that you've bought more flowers than you need or that you need a fuller bow, requiring more ribbon. This is a better time to realize these things than on the wedding day.
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