The trumpet-shaped blooms of the lily stand for purity, whether or not white flowers are tucked into the bouquet. Oriental lilies, which are in season during late summer, have a strong fragrance and larger blooms than the Asiatic lilies of early summer. A wedding bouquet comprised entirely of lilies looks contemporary and dramatic, but lilies also pair well with other flowers like roses or lisianthus.
When selecting your wedding celebration arrangement, you are not restricted to fresh flowers. Silk blossoms that are made today are produced to make sure that they look really similar to fresh flowers. If you hadn't thought about using silk blossoms for your wedding event bouquet, you could want to give them a doubt. Not just will you save money, you will not need to bother with the flowers wilting as well as protecting the blossoms is a less unpleasant process.
When in doubt, ask your florist for some insight. According to event planner Kristine Cholakian Cooke, owner of Simply Charming Socials, your florist should be able to give you some great alternatives that meet your expectations visually and are also more accessible for your date. "We always find that brides who are more open-minded going into initial floral meetings can truly learn about flowers and options they didn't know existed," says Cooke. "In the end, the results can be beautiful and unexpected."
Get lots of ideas: Look through magazines, books on floral decorating, visit fine floral shops, and take pictures of floral arrangements you like in public places. A five-star hotel is a great place to get ideas. Go on a Saturday and you'll probably see weddings already set up. The more ideas you have, the more you'll have to incorporate into your wedding flowers.
This poppy clutch with citrus accents exemplifies exactly what we're looking for in the perfect summer wedding bouquet. The Alicia K Designs arrangement had both seasonal flowers and seasonal colors. For more ideas as stunning and seasonally-appropriate as this one, click through the rest of our gallery. One thing's for sure: Each of these beautiful bouquets truly represents this unique time of year.

No matter your style, we think there's something ahead that'll catch your eye. That's because we've spotlighted such a wide range of clutches. Some of the following arrangements are definitively seasonal—you'll love the many fall bridal bouquets, for example. Others adhere to certain themes, like rustic, modern, and tropical. Plus, there are many that embrace totally unique color palettes.  
The awkward-sounding name of this bloom derives from Greek and means “love flower.” Most often available in shades of blue or sometimes white, these delicate flower clusters add volume without density to table centerpieces. Agapanthus is gorgeous on its own when tightly clustered into a bouquet but also adds a pop of color when combined with a neutral bloom such as baby's breath.
A simple single-flower wedding bouquet is not difficult to make, and the classic dome shape of this round bridal bouquet complements most wedding gowns. Be sure to stick to hardier flowers like roses, which are easier to arrange and can endure a little manhandling. To make a bridal bouquet about 8 inches in diameter, just follow the instructions below. This bouquet takes between 30 and 60 minutes to construct, and about 30 to 60 stems.
I must say I was a little hesitant on ordering silk wedding flowers and especially online. I ordered them and I was totally impressed at how beautiful they were. They really don't look like fake flowers at all! They were absolutely beautiful and the color was perfect! The silk bouquets were better than I ever thought they would be. Thanks so much! I will definitely tell friends about your website!

6. Once you’ve wound the wire all the way down the bottom of the stem wound the wire back up again. You want to make sure the flowers are tightly bound but don’t want to over-bind them because then  you will not be able to push pins through at a later step. When you get to the top of the stem again simply push the other rough edge into the center of the stems to keep it from poking someone.

The stalk and flower petals of the bells of Ireland embody the same soft green color and have a beautiful shape resembling a bell. They look best when creating an eclectic look on a dining room or coffee table and can stand on their own or be paired with other flowers in centerpieces and bouquets. The stems of the bells of Ireland are hollow and can be easily broken, so putting them in vases is the most ideal.
For an extra straightforward strategy, a wedding bouquet that you endure your arm may be better for you. Bridesmaids generally wear this wedding arrangement, but brides commonly select this design when they intend to use a solitary flower, such as a rose.
Flowers for the fitting: Plan to make one of your practice bouquets for the day you'll have your wedding gown fitting. Take the bouquet with you and critically evaluate the size, shape, length of stems, colors, and the style of your dress. Get the bridesmaids together at the same time. Make a note of the changes required to make them perfect. If some of the flowers don't look right (such as daisies with a silk beaded gown), make note of the changes needed. Confirm size, shape, and colors, too.
Our bridesmaids will be carrying champagne hydrangeas. For my bouquet and six bridesmaid bouquets to be done using real flowers through a florist we would be looking at over $300 for teeny tiny bouquets. The cost of us making our own (including a toss bouquet and cake table decorations) was $70. I’ve learned that there are so many hidden costs when planning a wedding that trying to come in under budget will usually end up putting you pretty close to your budget. Despite keeping costs down as much as possible Josh and I are still over our initial wedding budget. Hopefully we can find some more creative ways to save money to help keep our numbers down.
Practice, practice, practice: No matter how simple your plan or how confident you might feel, plan to do at least one (preferably two) practice run. Purchase the flowers you've selected to construct one centerpiece and one bouquet and put them together. Keep track of how long it takes to prepare that one, then multiply the time by how many you'll need to make. This will give you a great idea of how much time you'll need to dedicate to the flowers when the big day arrives. You might find that you've bought more flowers than you need or that you need a fuller bow, requiring more ribbon. This is a better time to realize these things than on the wedding day.
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