Myrtle is one of the most popular types of greenery because of the variety of ways that it can be used. It has long stems which are lined with glossy leaves. The thick foliage that this creates looks best in floral centerpieces. It also exudes a sweet fragrance that makes it perfect for home decor. The myrtle is a representation of love and for that reason is often found in wedding arrangements as well.
Blooming in early summer, yarrow comes in yellow tones, as well as white, pink, and red. The fern-like foliage is attractive as well as a fragrant addition to wedding flower arrangements. Brides should take some of their yarrow-containing flower arrangements home to grace their tables, as the cut flowers can last as long as three weeks. The flowers dry very well if you hang them upside down in a dry area for two weeks.
More commonly known as the carnation, the dianthus is an extremely popular flower that comes in a plethora of vibrant colors. The name dianthus comes from the two Greek words, “dios” and “anthos.” Dios refers to the Greek god, Zeus, and anthos means flower. Thus, they are known as the “flowers of God.” As regal and beautiful as they are, dianthus flowers look best as statement fillers in bouquets.
The trumpet-shaped blooms of the lily stand for purity, whether or not white flowers are tucked into the bouquet. Oriental lilies, which are in season during late summer, have a strong fragrance and larger blooms than the Asiatic lilies of early summer. A wedding bouquet comprised entirely of lilies looks contemporary and dramatic, but lilies also pair well with other flowers like roses or lisianthus.
DIY doesn’t save the world, and it isn’t always cheaper. But when it comes to wedding flowers I personally feel that the latter of the two should be true. When you hire a florist you are not only price quoted for the flowers, but also the labor put into making your floral arrangements. So, if you can take the labor out of the cost by making your own bouquet, you’ll be spending a lot less money.

Votives and candlelight are just as romantic as flowers, and they can help keep you within budget. "You can also mix in personal items for the table displays like pictures, keepsakes, or lanterns instead of concentrating solely on blooms," Arreguin and Burton advise. Another bright idea if you don't have a big flower budget? Concentrate on finding unique vessels that may take fewer flowers. Choose items that, when combined with other design objects such as the above-mentioned candles in multiples, will create a stunning centerpiece, recommends celebrity event planner Michael Cerbelli, CEO and president of Cerbelli Creative.


Practice, practice, practice: No matter how simple your plan or how confident you might feel, plan to do at least one (preferably two) practice run. Purchase the flowers you've selected to construct one centerpiece and one bouquet and put them together. Keep track of how long it takes to prepare that one, then multiply the time by how many you'll need to make. This will give you a great idea of how much time you'll need to dedicate to the flowers when the big day arrives. You might find that you've bought more flowers than you need or that you need a fuller bow, requiring more ribbon. This is a better time to realize these things than on the wedding day.
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