Get the look for less by following everyone's favorite fashion rule: Mix high with low! "One of the best ideas I have ever seen was the bride who had white roses and bushels of baby's breath," says Ani Keshishian, creative director of Anoush Banquet Halls & Catering and L.A. Banquets. "She alternated between roses on one table and baby's breath on another and you couldn't tell the difference in her photos. It was very elegant and did wonders for the feel of the wedding." If you're not a fan of alternating, try choosing a lot of filler like stock and greenery and adding in pops of the expensive and coveted flowers, such as David Austin roses or peonies, suggests Jennifer Arreguin and Natasha Burton, cofounders of Swoon California in Santa Barbara, California.

For an extra straightforward strategy, a wedding bouquet that you endure your arm may be better for you. Bridesmaids generally wear this wedding arrangement, but brides commonly select this design when they intend to use a solitary flower, such as a rose.


Sometimes you just have to go big or go home, right? So if large, over-the-top arrangements are what you want, get them, but try to give them multiple uses. "These arrangements can be placed on staggered columns to create a gorgeous backdrop for the ceremony," advises wedding planner Scoobie West of Scoobie & Company. "Then, during cocktail hour, they can be easily transported to the reception space."

Also known as the Peruvian lily, the alstroemeria originated in South Africa. Like its exotic name, the inner petals of this flower have stripes on them that create texture and diversity when added to bouquets.  They come in a range of colors from whites and golds to pinks and purples. The alstroemeria symbolizes friendship and devotion and is often seen in bouquets for friends or relatives.
Filler flowers can add pop to a floral arrangement or mellow it down. They aren’t quiet as exciting on their own, but when paired with other flowers they can make a monumental difference. Adding even the simplest of filler flowers can make a bouquet look more sophisticated. They come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and colors, so have fun testing out different types to find  what is right for you. Here is a list of the most popular types of filler flowers right now.
We live in a world of many, many options; and no one said that you had to go one place and one place only to get your flowers. With other aspects of your wedding, yes, you may have to be loyal to one particular supplier or vendor. But with your flowers, do what works for you and your budget. If you want to get your roses from Costco, but your greenery from the flower market, then go for it! There is no flower-buying etiquette to be followed here. Trust me: the flowers will understand.
A simple single-flower wedding bouquet is not difficult to make, and the classic dome shape of this round bridal bouquet complements most wedding gowns. Be sure to stick to hardier flowers like roses, which are easier to arrange and can endure a little manhandling. To make a bridal bouquet about 8 inches in diameter, just follow the instructions below. This bouquet takes between 30 and 60 minutes to construct, and about 30 to 60 stems.
Ivy is perfect for accessorizing and can be added to anything from floral headdresses to table centerpieces. The leaves of ivy are unique in their triangular shape. The leaves cascade down its branches, making it ideal for wrapping around wreaths and adding flow to floral baskets. Ivy has a longer lifespan than most types of greenery; it lasts for months or even years, so it works great for home decor during holiday months or celebrations.
Look at any bridal picture as well as you will certainly see a photo of a bride-to-be holding a wedding bouquet. It's a reasonably little item, however your wedding celebration bouquet should be on your top checklist of must-haves for your wedding event.
Summertime's sunshine brings about some of the prettiest flowers around. So, it should come as no surprise that some of our favorite wedding bouquets were carried by summer brides. This season is also associated with bright, happy colors—another big win in the bridal clutch category. To see what we mean, check out the following slides, which showcase an array of amazing summer wedding bouquet ideas.

Ivy is perfect for accessorizing and can be added to anything from floral headdresses to table centerpieces. The leaves of ivy are unique in their triangular shape. The leaves cascade down its branches, making it ideal for wrapping around wreaths and adding flow to floral baskets. Ivy has a longer lifespan than most types of greenery; it lasts for months or even years, so it works great for home decor during holiday months or celebrations.
Regardless of what you see in publications or at various other ceremonies, bear in mind that nearly anything is possible when it pertains to wedding celebration flowers. The two wedding blossom developers spoke with for this write-up are both examples. One is a professional on Hindu weddings, developing lovely covers of flowers under which the couple is married, and the various other has included feathers, twigs, candle lights, and also even road indications right into his designs.
But keep in mind that most of those beautiful arrangements and bridal bouquets you see in pictures or magazines were probably done by professional floral designers with years of design experience and floral know-how. But if you're up to it, make the project more fun than frustrating, more awesome than awful. The keys to beautiful wedding flowers are planning every detail, getting everything together in one place, and practice, practice, practice.
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