Ivy is perfect for accessorizing and can be added to anything from floral headdresses to table centerpieces. The leaves of ivy are unique in their triangular shape. The leaves cascade down its branches, making it ideal for wrapping around wreaths and adding flow to floral baskets. Ivy has a longer lifespan than most types of greenery; it lasts for months or even years, so it works great for home decor during holiday months or celebrations.


Almost every wedding reception includes centerpieces, and, more often than not, those centerpieces feature fresh flowers. We can't blame brides and grooms for sticking with tradition—it's not often that you get to fill your day with gorgeous blooms, making it easy to choose floral table décor over any other option. If that's not reason enough, flower arrangements often come with heavenly scents, which only seems to make them more irresistible.
The style of your bridal gown and the style of wedding celebration can influence the sort of wedding bouquet that is appropriate for you. One of the most prominent designs that brides pick for their wedding celebration bouquet consist of waterfall, nosegay, arm arrangement, and also hand-tied. As the name suggests, a waterfall wedding arrangement features an arrangement of blossoms that flow from the stem. A cascade wedding event arrangement is a very romantic style. Brides with standard wedding themes typically choose a waterfall wedding celebration arrangement.
When selecting your wedding celebration arrangement, you are not restricted to fresh flowers. Silk blossoms that are made today are produced to make sure that they look really similar to fresh flowers. If you hadn't thought about using silk blossoms for your wedding event bouquet, you could want to give them a doubt. Not just will you save money, you will not need to bother with the flowers wilting as well as protecting the blossoms is a less unpleasant process.
Practice, practice, practice: No matter how simple your plan or how confident you might feel, plan to do at least one (preferably two) practice run. Purchase the flowers you've selected to construct one centerpiece and one bouquet and put them together. Keep track of how long it takes to prepare that one, then multiply the time by how many you'll need to make. This will give you a great idea of how much time you'll need to dedicate to the flowers when the big day arrives. You might find that you've bought more flowers than you need or that you need a fuller bow, requiring more ribbon. This is a better time to realize these things than on the wedding day.

When in doubt, ask your florist for some insight. According to event planner Kristine Cholakian Cooke, owner of Simply Charming Socials, your florist should be able to give you some great alternatives that meet your expectations visually and are also more accessible for your date. "We always find that brides who are more open-minded going into initial floral meetings can truly learn about flowers and options they didn't know existed," says Cooke. "In the end, the results can be beautiful and unexpected."


different as well. It makes it less complicated for guests to track who's who.
Decide on your color scheme: If you have a favorite color, that's what you'll want for your wedding. But if the carpet is hideous in the room, you should probably think about a colors scheme that will help to take the eye off it. Or you may have fallen in love with some dresses for your bridesmaids. Choose your color scheme using any of these sources.
Select your flowers: Many different flowers can give the colors you choose. Will you want roses or carnations, orchids or iris? Your decision will be somewhat influenced by where you live and the season of the year. Lilacs are almost impossible to get (at a price you can afford) in January, so find other flowers that have a similar shade. You may decide to have all roses or an assortment of several varieties. Whatever you choose, make sure the flowers are available in your locale or place a special order for just what you want.

The epithet name for the tree fern is virgatus, which means twiggy. Because of its extremely thin stem, the tree fern is one of the easiest types of greenery to use. Unlike its namesake, the tree fern has thin, wispy branches and leaves that are often used in corsages and boutonnieres. The tree fern also works well as a solid background in a colorful bouquet.
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